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Biology

AMOS on Ubuntu

AMOS is a suite of genome assembly and editing software. It includes assemblers, validation, visualization, and scaffolding tools.  I have been having some issues installing AMOS on Ubuntu  9.10.  Specifically, Ubuntu 9.10 has gcc 4.4, which breaks the compilation of the AMOS release version. However, the development version has been fixed to accommodate that. If […]

I never metagenomics I didn’t like

“Let another man praise thee, and not thine own mouth; a stranger, and not thine own lips.” — Proverbs 27:2 “What-ever” —  Me In PLoS Computational Biology this week, a trio of researchers provides a review of the challenges that metagenomics might ― and already do ― pose for bioinformaticians. The authors refer to metagenomic […]

Paweł Szczęsny in TEDx Warsaw

Pawel on Open Science. Full disclosure: I consider sharing an office with this guy for over a year to be one of the best experiences of my postdoc.

Bioinformatics Blog Carnival #1

Yes! Why should the evolution people have all the fun with their blog carnival? (After all, it is only a theory.) It’s time for bioinformaticians to show what we are made of, and to have a carnival of our own. Bio::blogs had a good run some time ago. I decided to reconnect what is hopefully […]

A sh*tload of data

There are more microbial cells in our body than our own. Those microbes are not just passive hitchhikers or conversely, malicious agents of disease. They affect our well-being and health in a much broader spectrum than simply “bad” or “passive”. Among other things our gut microbes play an important role in digestion, have been linked […]

Blogosphere catches: Marco Island, finding Ada and blog carnivals

Some interesting events cropped up recently. The Marco Island Advances in Genome Biology and Technology meeting was heavily tweeted and blogged about.  Pacific Biosciences unveiled their third generation sequencer. Ostensibly, it can sequence reads of 20,000 length, but the fraction of actual long reads in a run, and their quality is still a bit hazy. […]

Bioinformatics blog carnival

Byte Size Biology will be hosting the first edition of the bioinformatics blog carnival. All you bioinformatics bloggers, submit your entries by Mar 9, 2010 23:59:03  EST. Note the 3 second extension I have already given. There will be no more deadline extensions, I’ve been generous enough as it is. The carnival will be posted […]

“Codon” is now a four letter word

As part of the process of manufacturing  a new car,  the designers will take the blueprints to the factory floor. There they will set up an experimental assembly line, tinkering with the manufacturing process of the prototype until it is ready for mass-production. Can we do the same with the machinery of life — the assembly […]

Ancient Greenlander’s DNA reveals ugly mullet

Seriously, this is what I first thought when I saw the cover of this week’s Nature, and the associated drawings  in the press.  The dude’s haircut seems like it was even bad in the ’80s… 2080 BCE that is, which is when his body is dated. Approximately. A large group of researchers were involved in […]

Highly Evolved

If the title of this post makes you cringe, then you belong to a minority of people who realize why the phrase “highly evolved” is so wrong. Unfortunately, “highly evolved” (as an absolute term) and “more evolved” (as a comparative term) seem  to be used all-too frequently.  They are uttered not only by non-scientists and […]

Short bioinformatic hacks: reading between the genes

In celebration of the biohackathon happening now in Tokyo, I am putting up a script that is oddly missing from many bioinformatic packages: extracting intergenic regions. This one was written together with my student, Ian. As for the biohackathon itself, I’m not there, but I am following the tweets and  Brad Chapman’s excellent posts: Day […]

BsB in high school science… nice

A  small spike on my blog traffic yesterday led me to look for the source via Google Analytics. (If you are a blogger, you should really use this tool, lots of useful traffic information.) Seems like most of the traffic came from the page of a high school science teacher at Badin High School in […]

The polypharmacome

Pharmaceutical companies are always on the lookout for secondary drug targets. After all, if you invest billions developing a single drug, you would be more than happy to sell it as a treatment for two, three, or more different ailments. Sildenafil citrate was developed to treat angina and hypertension, but during phase I clinical trials, […]

Poll: favorite kingdom?

Seems like I had a couple of taxonomic posts recently.  So BsB would like to know what is your favorite Kingdom of life. I used the 6 kingdom system just to make things slightly more interesting. Vote in the pollbox on the righthand sidebar. You only have yourself to blame if your favorite kingdom is […]

Social networking for taxonomists

Despite our best attempts to remove species from the face of the Earth, there is still quite a bit of life out there and it is still quite diverse. Also, there are still quite a few people who want to document, describe and make the rest of us aware of the magnitude and diversity of […]