Displaying posts tagged with

“Bioinformatics”

Bio-Linux. Now available in the Cloud

For some time now, NERC has been providing us with Bio-Linux. If you don’t want to be bothered with installing all the essential bioinformatic software for your Ubuntu box, you can install Bio-Linux, either as a a Linux distro for installation from scratch, or as a set of packages for an already existing Debian or Ubuntu […]

Function predictor? Submit your work to the CAFA meeting

  Last July I introduced CAFA: Critical Assessment of (Gene and Protein) Function Annotations. Recap: the number of genomic and metagenomic sequences is growing at a horrendous rate. We are inundated with sequence data, yet the fraction of useful information we can glean from these sequences is steadily decreasing. There are simply too many sequences, and they are […]

You know your graduate student is frustrated when…

…you find this on the top of the paper pile on his desk:

The Oxygen Rush: late January, all of February and a Day in November

I have just returned from British Columbia in Canada. I have to admit that their license plate motto is quite accurate: BC is incredibly beautiful. Another thing that struck me is the provincial flag of BC: the Union Jack at the top (OK, it is British Columbia), there are white and blue horizontal stripes, and […]

Lake Arrowhead Microbial Genomics Conference

Quick post: at the Lake Arrowhead Microbial Genomics Conference. I’m a bad microblogger, but thankfully Jonathan Eisen and Ruchira Datta are doing a great job of covering this conference live. There is a friendfeed room. The Twitter hashtag is #LAMG10.  The science, people, food and location are all great. My student, David Ream, is presenting […]

Protein Function: how do we know that we know what we know?

The trouble with genomic sequencing, is that it is too cheap. Anyone that has a bit of extra cash laying around, you can scrape the bugs off your windshield, sequence them, and write a paper. Seriously? Yes, seriously now: as we sequence more and more genomes, our annotation tools cannot keep up with them. It’s […]

Bioinformatics Open Source Conference 2010 (and a poll)

The 11th Annual Bioinformatics Open Source Conference (BOSC) 2010 is coming up in Boston, July 9-10 2010. The BOSC meetings are a great get-together of a community of programmers who are like-minded in their advocacy of open source code for science, and specifically for bioinformatics. The whole thing is run by volunteers who take a […]

Computational Bridge to Experiments

A bit of background information: this is a meeting I am really happy to be part of, and even more so honored to be a co-organizer. One of my main scientific interests is the prediction of the function of genes and proteins of unknown function. Some background information: we have sequenced more than 1000 genomes […]

Closing gaps

Geek alert: this post for coders. So you sequenced your genome, reached an optimally small number of contigs, they look sane, and now you would like to see what you need for the finishing stage. Namely, how many gaps you have and what are their sizes. UPDATE: “might just be worth clarifying this is for […]

Comparative Functional Genomics: Penguin vs. Bacterium

No, not the flesh-blood-and-feathers penguin, but rather Tux, the beloved mascot of the Linux operating system. Compared with Escherichia coli, the model organism of choice for microbiologists. We refer to DNA as “the book of life”; some geeks refer to it as the “operating system of life”. Just like in a computer’s operating system, DNA […]

Combrex: Computational Bridge to Experiments

Combrex is an exciting new project at Boston University to bridge computational and experimental techniques to functionally annotate proteins. They are hiring, see below: JOB POST We are seeking to hire a creative computational scientist for a transformative project: COMBREX: A Computational Bridge to Experiments. The work will involve building a novel resource that combines […]

I never metagenomics I didn’t like

“Let another man praise thee, and not thine own mouth; a stranger, and not thine own lips.” — Proverbs 27:2 “What-ever” –  Me In PLoS Computational Biology this week, a trio of researchers provides a review of the challenges that metagenomics might ― and already do ― pose for bioinformaticians. The authors refer to metagenomic […]

Bioinformatics Blog Carnival #1

Yes! Why should the evolution people have all the fun with their blog carnival? (After all, it is only a theory.) It’s time for bioinformaticians to show what we are made of, and to have a carnival of our own. Bio::blogs had a good run some time ago. I decided to reconnect what is hopefully […]

Bioinformatics blog carnival

Byte Size Biology will be hosting the first edition of the bioinformatics blog carnival. All you bioinformatics bloggers, submit your entries by Mar 9, 2010 23:59:03  EST. Note the 3 second extension I have already given. There will be no more deadline extensions, I’ve been generous enough as it is. The carnival will be posted […]

Short bioinformatic hacks: reading between the genes

In celebration of the biohackathon happening now in Tokyo, I am putting up a script that is oddly missing from many bioinformatic packages: extracting intergenic regions. This one was written together with my student, Ian. As for the biohackathon itself, I’m not there, but I am following the tweets and  Brad Chapman’s excellent posts: Day […]